What Are the Typical Concert Bag Sizes?

Concert Bag Sizes

You’re allowed to bring bags to a concert—it just has to be within specific size and material limits. So, the next time you head to a venue to attend a concert, a sporting event, or a large gathering (think Comicon), make sure you’re not toting a large tote.

Every venue has its own set of rules regarding bag sizes. However, the average concert bag size appears to be around 14 × 14 × 6 inches.

Typical concert bag sizes

Today, I’ll describe what a concert bag is, what the different concert bag sizes are based on the venue, why such restrictions exist in the first place, and what you should look for in a concert bag.

What Is a Concert Bag?

What Is a Concert Bag

When you attend your next concert, you’re going to need to take a bag with you. That way, you have somewhere to place your merch rather than carrying them in your arms. You’ll also need a bag to keep bottled water with you at all times since, of course, everyone needs to stay hydrated!

But what is a concert bag? As the name suggests, a concert bag is a bag that you can take with you to a concert. It’s mainly used for carrying your essentials, such as parking and concert tickets. You can use a concert bag outside of concerts, but they’re not very large.

Concert Bag Sizes (Based on Venue)

So, we’ve established that concert bags aren’t very large, but how “not very large” are they? On average, concert bags measure 14 × 14 × 6 inches when full. Compared to the typical backpack (22 × 14 × 9 inches), there’s not a lot of storage space.

See also  What Size Shoe Laces Do I Need?

However, the permitted concert bag size varies from venue to venue. Here’s a list of concert bag size allowances in some of the most well-known concert and sporting event arenas.

VenueConcert Bag Policy
American Airlines Center14 × 14 × 6 in.
Amway C21renter14 × 14 × 6 in.
AT&T Center12 × 12 × 6 in.
Ball Arena14 × 14 × 6 in.
Barclay’s Center14 × 14 × 6 in.
Capital One Arena14 × 14 × 6 in.
Chase Center14 × 14 × 6 in.
Crypto.com Arena14 × 14 × 6 in.
El Ray Theater14 × 14 in.
FedExForum14 × 14 × 6 in.
Fiserv ForumNot allowed
Footprint Center14 × 14 × 6 in.
FTX Arena10 × 6 in.*
Gainbridge Fieldhouse6 × 9 × 1.5 in.*
George Amphitheater1-gallon plastic bag
Golden 1 Center8 × 6 × 1 in.*
Little Caesars Arena14 × 14 × 6 in.
Madison Square GardenMust fit underneath seat
Ruoff Music Center12 × 12 × 6 in.

* denotes empty bag sizes

Why Are There Concert Bag Size Restrictions?

The reason concert venues set strict bag size restrictions is that it increases the safety and comfort of all concert-goers. Can you imagine trying to squeeze your way to your seat when the rows are packed with suitcases and duffel bags?

Also, the size restrictions listed above may only refer to emergency bags or diaper bags. The actual bag size you can bring into a venue may be much smaller if you aren’t with a child or have a health condition.

While the size of your concert bag must fit within the venue’s size limits, the material and appearance of the bag are far more important. The Clear Bag Policy is a policy that states all bags must be transparent. That way, security will have an easier time checking your belongings and confiscating things they deem are dangerous. All of your bags are subject to search, no questions asked.

See also  How Much Weight Can a Backpack Hold? - Ultimate Guide

What to Look for in a Concert Bag

In general, there are three key things to keep in mind when shopping for a concert bag:

Size

Obviously, the bag must fit within the venue’s size limits. It’s safer to choose a considerably smaller bag than it is to get a bag that’s even half an inch larger. If your bag is too large for the venue, some security officers will prohibit you from entering.

Security

The best concert bags have zippers, latches, and other safety features to keep your belongings from spilling out. Satchels with insecure flaps may not be the wisest choice since people can easily stick their hands in there to steal your phone.

Transparency

Without exception, your bag must have at least 1 transparent side. That way, the security officers can see what you’re bringing and instantly determine whether or not you’re a danger to anyone in the venue. If your bag isn’t transparent, you may be denied entry into the concert.

Do You Need a Concert Bag?

Do You Need a Concert Bag

Absolutely not. Concert bags make visiting concerts a lot more convenient since your belongings are stored in one place. However, if you don’t bring anything with you other than what fits in your pocket, you’ll have an easier time getting into the venue.

Many concert venues advise bringing a transparent resealable bag, such as a Ziploc sandwich bag, rather than a concert bag. That way, your belongings are instantly identifiable without having to go through the contents (in most cases).

Now, where should you put your sandwich bag while attending a concert? Ideally, it will fit in your pocket. If that’s out of the question, you will have to carry it around like a purse.

See also  What Are the Loungefly Backpack Sizes?

What Can You Bring into a Concert?

It depends on whether the concert is indoors or out.

For indoor concerts, you will only need to bring your essentials—wallet, keys, smartphone, water bottles (you’ll have to purchase water from concession stands), and your concert and parking tickets.

If you’re attending an outdoor concert, you should bring sunscreen, bug repellent, sunglasses, and other items to protect you against the elements.

What Can’t You Bring into a Concert?

There’s a long list of items that you’re not allowed to take with you to any concert. I’ll list some of the more common items below.

  • Cigarettes
  • Alcohol
  • Beverages and snacks purchased outside the venue
  • Laser pens
  • Weapons
  • Additional clothing (indoor venues)
avatar
BaronCooke

Baron Cooke has been writing and editing for 7 years. He grew up with an aptitude for geometry, statistics, and dimensions. He has a BA in construction management and also has studied civil infrastructure, engineering, and measurements. He is the head writer of measuringknowhow.com

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *