How Big Are the Strollers that Are Allowed at Disneyland?

Disneyland Stroller Dimensions

They say that Disneyland is one of the happiest places in the world, but how true can that be? The place is crowded, the lines are long, and the food is way, way overpriced! But to make it even harder on families, your baby’s strollers cannot exceed a specific size restriction.

In Disneyland, your stroller cannot be larger than 31 inches wide and 52 inches long. The height restriction of strollers is unspecified, but you cannot take wagons or stroller wagons into the park.

So, what’s the deal with stroller restrictions at Disneyland? Can you rent strollers while you’re there? And should you rent? I’ll answer these questions and more down below.

What Are the Disneyland Stroller Dimensions

What Are the Disneyland Stroller Dimensions

In May of 2019, Disneyland officials (that doesn’t sound very fun, does it?) enacted a stroller policy inside their park. Strollers must be smaller than 31 inches wide and 52 inches long. If your baby’s stroller is larger than that, then you cannot take it into the park.

In the past, families were allowed to take red wagons with them into the park. They didn’t provide much in terms of shading, but they allowed people to take large items with them around the park. Today, wagons are 100% prohibited from the park. That includes stroller wagons, too.

Disney is still trying to figure out the best way to implement its stroller restriction rules, so there’s a chance that the approved stroller dimensions may change in the future.

Disney-Approved Double Strollers

Disney has released a list of double strollers that they have deemed acceptable for use inside their parks.

Why Did Disneyland Restrict Stroller Sizes?

So, why are Disneyland regulators so cruel? The thing is that Disneyland, being one of the most crowded parks in the country, can get congested really quickly. Much of that congestion can be attributed to large strollers since, as the old adage goes, bigger is always better.

When people have trouble navigating around the park, it worsens the patrons’ experience, and it limits the number of rides and vendors people can visit per day. Essentially, it boils down the Disney’s bottom line.

Disneyland Stroller Rentals

Disneyland Stroller Rentals

But there’s a silver lining for those who have oversized strollers and still want to visit the park. You don’t have to purchase a brand-new stroller that meets Disneyland’s stroller size requirements; all you have to do is navigate to the stroller rental spot located near the Park Main Entrance.

Renting a stroller at Disneyland will cost you $18 per day. Or you can get a double stroller for your 2 children and pay $36 per day.

If you have your own stroller that you think meets the size restrictions at Disneyland, you just have to park the stroller in the sizing box to prove it.

Alternatively, if you don’t want to pay $18 to $36 for a Disneyland stroller, you are more than welcome to rent from a third party. Services like Kingdom Strollers, Magic Strollers, and Orlando Stroller Rentals would be more than happy to rent you their strollers. They’ll even be so kind as to drop the stroller off at your hotel and pick it up when you’re done.

Should I Rent a Stroller?

$18 to $36 per day for a stroller is, in my humble opinion, outrageous. Everything at Disneyland is already overpriced, and now, they want to take more of our money by implementing a stroller size restriction.

Well, it’s not as simple as that. A brand-new stroller that meets Disneyland’s size restrictions can cost a boatload of money. Just take a look at the Baby Jogger City Mini 2 Stroller to see what I mean.

Here are a few pros and cons of renting a stroller:

Pros

  • Stroller rental services will deliver strollers to your hotel.
  • You can use the stroller anywhere in the park.
  • The strollers are designed to be as comfortable for your children as possible.
  • External stroller vendors may also offer specialized strollers to meet your child’s specific needs.
  • Disneyland will replace a Disney-rented stroller if anything is wrong with it.

Cons

  • $18 to $36 per day!
  • Disney-rented strollers cannot leave the park, forcing you to carry your child from the main entrance to your parked car.
  • For external stroller vendors, you might have to get insurance for the stroller, so you will not be liable for any damage the stroller has incurred under your watch.

Are There Exceptions to This Rule?

Yes, there are. Just because the Disneyland crew is motivated by money doesn’t mean they’re completely heartless!

If your child suffers from a physical disability that requires a larger stroller, Disneyland won’t stop you from entering the park. If you have any questions, you can reach out to Disneyland’s Disability Services.

Tips for Taking Strollers to Disneyland

  1. If you plan on taking your own stroller to the park, make sure you measure it carefully before leaving home. You should measure the stroller at its widest points to ensure that the wheels or axles do not extend beyond 31 inches wide and 52 inches long.
  2. Disneyland strollers, while comfortable, don’t offer much in terms of storage space. They’re the barebones minimum of what you should expect from a stroller. So, it’s almost always better to take your own stroller.
  3. Add tags to your stroller to make it stand out. You cannot take strollers in or on rides, so make sure you can identify them from the sea of other empty strollers.
  4. Keep the stroller rental receipt with you at all times. Do not place the receipt in the stroller. If you lose the stroller while you’re there, Disneyland will give you a replacement stroller as long as you provide the receipt. This isn’t the case for rented strollers from outside vendors.
  5. If you plan on visiting Disneyland frequently, then you might want to consider purchasing an approved stroller at Disneyland. They’re guaranteed to meet the size restrictions, and they’re a lot more comfortable than the rented options.
BaronCooke

Baron Cooke has been writing and editing for 7 years. He grew up with an aptitude for geometry, statistics, and dimensions. He has a BA in construction management and also has studied civil infrastructure, engineering, and measurements. He is the head writer of measuringknowhow.com

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