How Big Is a Quarter acre of Land?

How Big Is a Quarter acre of Land?

A little bit really goes a long way, especially when measuring in acres. If you don’t have the funds for 1 acre of land, then you should consider looking at smaller options, like a quarter-acre. But how big is a quarter-acre of land?

A quarter-acre of land is equal to 10,890 square feet (1,011.71 square meters).

For those who have more questions about a quarter-acre of land, I’m not going to leave you hanging. I’ll discuss in greater detail what a quarter-acre of land is, as well as offer a few things you can use to envision what a quarter-acre of land looks like in your mind’s eye.

What is Acreage?

What is Acreage?

Before we start chopping acres into halves, thirds, and quarters, let’s talk about what one acre of land is.

The United States is one of the only countries that uses standard imperial. As such, its citizens will typically measure the total area of a plot of land in acreage.

A single acre of land is the equivalent of 43,560 square feet (4,046.86 square meters). That means a plot of land measuring 66 × 660 feet (20.12 × 201.17 meters) or 208 × 208 feet (63.4 × 63.4 meters) will equal one acre.

Countries that use the metric system will count land area by square meters, square kilometers, or by hectares. One hectare is the same as 10,000 square meters or 0.01 square kilometers (107,639 square feet or 2.47 acres).

Now that that’s out of the way, you should have an easier time understanding how large a quarter-acre of land is.

Quarter-acre

Simply put, a quarter-acre is the equivalent of 25% of one acre, which is why it is often denoted as 0.25 acres.

So, taking the total square footage of an acre (43,560 square feet or 4,046.86 square meters), we can begin breaking it down into quarter chunks.

One quarter-acre of land is equal to 10,890 square feet (1,011.71 square meters) in any dimension you can think of.

  • A square quarter-acre plot of land would equal 104.36 × 104.36 feet (31.81 × 31.81 meters).
  • A rectangular quarter-acre plot of land may measure 99 × 110 feet (30.18 × 33.53 meters).
  • And so on.

4 Examples to Help You Envision a Quarter-Acre of Land

Now, it’s simple enough to calculate how big a quarter-acre of land is, but it doesn’t explain what it actually looks like. In the following examples, I’ll show you what you can do to envision a quarter-acre of land.

24-27 Semi-Truck Trailers

24-27 Semi Truck Trailers

The dimensions of a semi-truck trailer range from 48 to 53 feet (14.63 to 16.15 meters) in length and 8.5 feet (2.6 meters) wide, giving us a total area of between 408 t0 450.5 square feet (37.9 to 41.82 square meters).

With that in mind, how many semi-truck trailers could you park on a quarter-acre plot of land? The answer is between 24 and 27. Depending on which trailer size you go with.

2.3 Basketball Courts

2.3 Basketball Courts

If you’re a fan of the NBA or basketball in general, you may know that the dimensions of a basketball court are 50 × 94 feet (15.24 × 28.65 meters). The total playing area of a basketball court is 4,700 square feet (436.64 square meters).

So, if we divide the total square footage of a quarter-acre (10,890 square feet) by the playing area of an NBA-approved basketball court, we’ll get 2.32.

4 Homes

4 Homes

If you own a home in the United States, you should have a pretty good idea of how much square footage of land your home covers. According to a 2015 report by the US Department of Commerce, the average home covers about 2,687 square feet (249.63 square meters).

That means a total of 4.03 average-sized US homes could fit snugly inside of a quarter-acre plot of land.

Footsteps

Footsteps

Calculating long distances (or wide areas) is possible in footstep terms, as long as you can get a feel for how much distance each of your footsteps can cover. On average, men will cover 30 inches (76.2 centimeters) per footstep, whereas women can cover about 26 inches (66 centimeters).

So, if we were to draw out a plot of land measuring 99 × 110 feet (30.18 × 33.53 meters), you would need to do the following:

A man should take 40 footsteps in one direction, turn 90 degrees, then take an additional 44 footsteps.

A woman should take 46 footsteps in one direction, turn 90 degrees, then take an additional 51 footsteps.

If done correctly, you should have walked along two outside borders of a quarter-acre plot of land.

FAQ About a Quarter-Acre of Land

1. What can I do with a quarter-acre of land?

Other than building a parking spot for 24-27 semi-truck trailers, 2.3 NBA-sized basketball courts, or four homes, you can grow entire crops on such a vast space of land.

If you want to raise chickens, you should know that each chicken requires around 5 square feet (0.46 square meters) of outdoor space. That means a quarter-acre plot of land could become a sanctuary to 2,178 free-range chickens!

2. How much is a quarter-acre plot of land worth?

Generally speaking, the cheapest plots of land in the United States will be in deserts that are far from civilization and utilities, so Las Vegas does not fall into this category.

You must speak to your real estate agent to get a definitive cost figure. Even in a single city, the price per square foot of land can vary drastically, depending on a number of factors.

3. How long would it take to mow a quarter-acre of land?

How long it takes to mow a quarter-acre plot of land depends on the tool you’re using. For instance, using a push mower with a 22-inch deck may take you upwards of 90 minutes, whereas a riding lawn mower with a 50- to 60-inch deck could reduce your work to a mere 20 to 30 minutes.

Conclusion

In this guide, I explained how many square feet are in a quarter-acre of land (10,890 square feet or 1,011.71 square meters). I also provided examples of what a quarter-acre land would look like.

If this guide helped you understand a quarter-acre of land, make sure you share it with your friends on social media. Also, leave a comment down below and let me know how you would use a quarter-acre piece of land.

BaronCooke

Baron Cooke has been writing and editing for 7 years. He grew up with an aptitude for geometry, statistics, and dimensions. He has a BA in construction management and also has studied civil infrastructure, engineering, and measurements. He is the head writer of measuringknowhow.com

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