Guide to Peloton Bike Mat Dimensions

Peloton Bike Mat Dimensions

If you have a Peloton Bike or are considering getting one, you should take a look at the top-notch accessories it can come with. The Peloton bike mat is a handy piece of equipment to have for stopping sweat droplets from dirtying your floors.

The dimensions of a basic Peloton Bike Mat are 36 × 72 inches (0.91 × 1.82 meters). The Peloton Reversible Workout Mat measures 26 × 71 inches (0.66 × 1.80 meters). Both mats are 4 millimeters (0.16 inches) thick.

If you’d like to learn more about Peloton Bike Mats, continue reading.

Peloton Bike Mat Sizes

Peloton Bike Mat Sizes

If you take a look at Peloton’s online store, you’ll notice that it has four Bike and four Bike+ deals to choose from. Both the Bike and Bike+ offer purchase options that come with a Bike Mat or a Bike Mat and the Reversible Workout Mat.

The Bike Mat and Reversible Workout Mat are designed to add stability to the Peloton Bike, as well as catch fallen sweat droplets as you follow the rigorous cycling guides.

The standard Bike Mat measures 36 × 72 inches (0.91 × 1.82 meters), whereas the Reversible Workout Mat is 26 × 71 inches (0.66 × 1.80 meters). Both Bike Mats are wide enough for the Peloton Bike, which measures 24 × 48 inches (0.61 × 1.21 meters), as well as captures any sweat that gets flung to the sides. Both Peloton Mats measure 4 millimeters (0.16 inches) in thickness.

When comparing the Peloton Bike Mat and the Reversible Workout Mat, they have slight differences apart from size. Both are made of easy-to-clean materials, but the Reversible Workout Mat has a textured side that offers a better grip on bare floors and carpets. You can also use the Reversible Workout Mat with the texture-side up for yoga.

Do You Need a Peloton Bike Mat for a Peloton Bike?

Absolutely not. Users are more than free to check out retailers who offer bike mats and workout mats for Peloton Bikes.

When choosing a mat for your Peloton Bike—or any exercise bike, for that matter—you will want to look out for the following:

Dimension: The size of the bike mat should be wide and long enough to fit the exercise bike. Ideally, there will be several inches of clearance in all four directions to capture any sweat droplets that accumulate all over your body.

Material: The material that goes into a bike mat should be easy to clean, as well as shock-absorbent. PVC is a great option as it’s highly durable, absorbs vibrations, and can be cleaned with a quick wipe of a clean cloth.

Textured: A textured bike mat grips onto bare floors better than untextured mats. This is important if you plan on placing your exercise bike in an uncarpeted part of your home—e.g., bedroom, garage, home gym, etc.

Does a Peloton Bike Need a Bike Mat?

You may not need to get a mat for your Peloton Bike, but it’s highly recommended, especially if you want to install it on bare floors.

There is no telling how much damage the feet and stands of your Peloton Bike will do to your lovely hardwood or tiled floors. Even if you are going to place it on a carpet, you should still consider that bike mats add traction, as well as capture sweat that drops from your body onto the floor.

With all that said, you can use any indoor exercise bike without a bike mat, but you should still give it some thought.

How Much Space Do I Need for a Peloton Bike and Bike Mat?

According to Peloton’s Guide on where to place the exercise bike, your Peloton Bike can go virtually anywhere in your home or apartment due to its tiny footprint.

The only thing to keep in mind is how tall your ceilings are. Peloton advises a minimum ceiling height of 8 feet (2.44 meters) to allow for adequate headroom while riding the bike.

However, you should also be mindful of front, back, and side clearance. Some people would advise having a minimum of 2 feet of clearance in any direction from an exercise bike for maximum safety.

FAQ About Peloton Bikes

1. What makes Peloton Bikes different from other indoor exercise bikes?

Peloton Bikes come with a wide range of high-tech features, including rotating LED screens and built-in memory to download and store instructor-led video classes. There are also Peloton accessories you can get for your bike, apart from the Bike Mat and Workout Mat, which includes a Heart Rate Band and a Heart Rate Chest Strap.

2. Do Peloton classes promote weight loss?

You can follow many of Peloton’s prerecorded video classes to help with weight loss. There are a dozen different class types with a collective library consisting of over 22,000 videos. However, if your aim is to lose weight while cycling, you should check out Peloton’s library of cycling videos to burn fat.

3. How does the Peloton Bike differ from the Bike+?

The Bike+ is the more expensive option between the two Peloton Bikes. As such, it comes with improved hardware that justifies the significant price difference. You learn about 16 differences between the Bike and Bike+ here, but in short, the Bike+ is the much superior option in terms of screen quality, wireless connectivity, camera quality, and calibration accuracy.

4. Is it cheaper to get a Peloton Bike+ or Bike+ package deal?

Peloton offers the Bike and Bike+ equipment a la carte. However, if you plan on purchasing accessories for your exercise bike, you should consider picking up a bundle package since there is a significant price difference between buying accessories individually and in a package.

Conclusion

Peloton is well-known for its high-tech indoor exercise bikes and wide range of accessories. One of the more essential pieces of equipment to have for your Peloton Bike is the Bike Mat, which measures 36 × 72 inches (0.91 × 1.82 meters). Peloton also offers a Workout Mat, which measures 26 × 71 inches (0.66 × 1.80 meters).

If you found this article helpful, I’d appreciate it if you could share it on your social media. Also, if you have a Peloton Bike or Bike+, let me know whether getting the Bike Mat is worth it.

BaronCooke

Baron Cooke has been writing and editing for 7 years. He grew up with an aptitude for geometry, statistics, and dimensions. He has a BA in construction management and also has studied civil infrastructure, engineering, and measurements. He is the head writer of measuringknowhow.com

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