11 Common Things That Are Around 2 Millimeters

Things That Are Around 2 Millimeters

Did you know that 2 millimeters is the same as 0.0787402 inches? It’s quite a small unit of measurement, which makes measuring 2 millimeters a challenge.

The best thing you can do to measure 2 millimeters is by memorizing the lengths, widths, or thicknesses of everyday objects that come close to that measurement. That way, you won’t have to whip out your ruler or tape measure whenever you need to measure something so small.

Today, I’ll show you 11 common objects you can use as references for measuring 2 millimeters, or close to it, by eye.

Dollar Coin

Dollar Coin

In the United States, there are 7 coin denominations, with the most popular coins being the nickel, dime, and quarter. If you want to see what 2 millimeters looks like, you will have to find a lesser-used yet valuable ollar coin.

Alternatively, if you only have nickels lying around, you can use a single nickel to get close to the 2-millimeter figure since each nickel measures 1.95 millimeters thick.

1 – 3 Ants

Ants

Ants are pesky creatures that show up whenever there is old food lying around. They will come out of hidden holes in the kitchen for a quick nibble of food, and they’ll call their entire colony to partake and bring some of the deliciousness home with them.

There are more than 10,000 known ant species all over the world, and they measure between 0.75 and 52 millimeters in length. The odorous house ant, which is one of the most common pests, measures about 1/16 of an inch long or roughly 1.59 millimeters.

Grain of Rice

Grain of Rice

Did you know that there are over 120,000 varieties of rice grown all over the world? It’s also a staple food in many parts of the world, particularly in Asia, where some places don’t consider anything to be a meal unless there is a hefty serving of rice in a bowl or on a plate.

Rice comes in all lengths and thicknesses, with some species measuring close to 6 millimeters in length. If you can’t envision dividing the length of long-grain rice into thirds, you can use its thickness as a reference since it measures close to 2 millimeters.

Peanut

Peanut

Peanuts are a tasty snack that many people eat while watching TV. They’re also quite rich in protein and fiber, and their fat content is through the roof (don’t worry, it’s the good kind of fat!). Also, did you know that peanuts belong to the legume family, despite the word “nut” in its name?

If you took a peanut and pulled the two halves apart, you would get a thickness of roughly 2 millimeters. Another random fact about peanuts is that there are 6 cities in the US named after the legume.

Audio Jack

Audio Jack

Do you remember when phones came standard with audio jacks? Nowadays, major phone manufacturers like Apple and Samsung have done away with audio jacks in order to sell more wireless earbuds.

Anyway, the standard audio jack for headphones would measure 2.5 millimeters. However, audio jacks can be as large as 3.5 millimeters or even 6.5 millimeters.

11 Sheets of Paper

11 Sheets of Paper

Not all kinds of paper are made the same. Some sheets of paper are made thicker and sturdier than others and will cost you a bit more as opposed to the cheap, ultra-thin sheets. However, if you took the average thickness of paper, which is 0.18 millimeters, then you would need about 11 of them to get to 2 millimeters.

The thinner sheets can measure roughly 0.1 millimeters thick, which would mean 20 sheets together would give you a collective thickness of 2 millimeters. Cardstock, on the other hand, is about 0.6 millimeters thick, so only about 3 of them would get you the full 2 millimeters.

Toothpick

Toothpick

Toothpicks are a part of human history. They’ve been there since the dawn of time as the go-to tool for removing food remnants from our teeth. Today, they’re found in nearly every restaurant, and many people might not even bother using toothpicks since frequent use can lead to enamel damage.

Anyway, a toothpick generally measures 0.07 inches thick, which translates to 1.79 millimeters. Plastic toothpicks are usually thicker at around 0.12 inches or 3.05 millimeters. Either way, you’d get pretty close to the 2-millimeter figure.

2 Rulers

2 Rulers

If you have a ruler, the easiest way you can measure 2 millimeters is by using the metric side. However, if you don’t feel like looking at the tiny lines, then you can use the ruler’s thickness as a way to measure 2 millimeters.

Many plastic rulers without ridges will measure precisely 1 millimeter thick. So, laying 2 rulers on top of each other would get you to 2 millimeters exactly. Alternatively, you can use a wooden ruler with ridges and measure the thickness, including the top of the highest ridge, to get pretty close.

4 Fingernails

4 Fingernails

The next time you clip your fingernails, don’t toss them in the garbage just yet. The thickness of your fingernail can be used as a reference for measuring 2 millimeters. The average thickness is about 0.481 millimeters, so 4 of them would get you slightly beyond 2 millimeters.

Did you know that fingernails grow at an average rate of 3.5 millimeters per month? So, if you wanted to, you could measure the white portion that protrudes away from your fingertips to measure 2 millimeters every 17 days.

Washable Mask

Washable Mask

With everything going on, it’s not uncommon to find people sporting masks wherever they go. One type of mask that you’ll typically find people wearing is washable cloth masks, which some people have deemed ineffective at blocking minuscule viruses and bacteria.

Washable masks have a thickness of roughly 2.08 millimeters, though they’re not as effective as surgical masks that only measure 1.24 millimeters thick. In terms of safety, it’s not the thickness of the mask that matters but the final ply count.

Ceramic Tile

Ceramic Tile

The next time you want to remodel your kitchen or bathroom floor, take a good look at the thickness of your ceramic tiles. On average, a ceramic tile will measure between 1/8 and ½ an inch. If you use a thinner variety, you would get only slightly beyond the 2-millimeter point.

Ceramic is known for its durability and lack of absorbency, making them perfect for lining the floors in high-moisture parts of your home.

BaronCooke

Baron Cooke has been writing and editing for 7 years. He grew up with an aptitude for geometry, statistics, and dimensions. He has a BA in construction management and also has studied civil infrastructure, engineering, and measurements. He is the head writer of measuringknowhow.com

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