Guide to Wiffle Ball Field Dimensions

Wiffle ball

Wiffleball is a sport that anyone can enjoy during the summer. It doesn’t require a ton of costly equipment like baseball or tennis does, and anyone of any age will have fun hitting a Wiffle ball around.

The sport originated in Connecticut when David N. Mullany came up with the idea to hit a perforated ball in his backyard. In the 1950s. The sport was rudimentary at best, but it was for avid baseball fans to play a version of the sport in their own backyards.

Even though you don’t need a full-sized MLB field to play Wiffleball, there have been some levels of confusion surrounding Wiffleball field dimensions. In this article, I’ll describe what the Wiffleball field dimensions are and what you’ll need to play the sport.

Wiffle Ball Field Dimensions

A Wiffleball field is unlike that of baseball. When designing a regulation Wiffleball field in your backyard or a local park, you should pay attention to the following points:

  • The 4 bases are spaced evenly apart at 35 feet
  • The 4 bases are positioned in a diamond pattern
  • The distance between each plate should measure 35 feet
  • The distance between home and second should measure 50 feet
  • The distance between first and third should measure 50 feet
  • The distance between home and the pitcher’s mound should be 42 feet
  • 2 foul poles are placed 95 feet away from home
  • The playable zone of the straightaway centerfield is 105 feet in front of home plate
  • A 15-foot arc from home is the foul zone
  • Between the 15-foot arc and a 45-foot arc from home is the out-zone
  • Between the 45-foot arc and a 65-foot arc from home is the single-zone
  • Between the 65-foot arc and an 85-foot arc from home is the double-zone
  • Between the 85-foot arc and a 95-foot arc from home is the triple-zone

The 2018 Wiffleball League Rules established by New Baltimore Parks & Recreation will give you a good idea of what the Wiffleball field should look like.

Wiffleball Field Rules

Wiffleball Field Rules

The more you research Wiffleball fields, the more you’ll discover that the field doesn’t have a standard size, except for fields used for league play.

So, in essence, hobbyist Wiffleball players don’t need to worry about constructing a field that adheres to a league’s rules—as long as there is enough space to play in your backyard and that all players can agree on a set of rules (foul, single, double, triple, home run zones), anyone can have fun.

In fact, even according to David N. Mullany’s grandchildren, who run the official site for Wiffleball, there are no standardized Wiffleball field dimensions. Players are even free to construct a field on dirt, grass, concrete, or any surface they wish to play on.

A Step-by-Step Guide on Making a Wiffle Ball Field

Like any sport you and your friends or family play in the backyard, you don’t need costly materials or supplies to build a set up a Wiffleball field at home. As long as everyone can agree on the bases are, where the foul lines are, what arcs make up the foul, out, and hit zones, then you don’t need to spend a single cent.

However, if you want your Wiffleball field to look somewhat professional and based on the Wiffle ball field dimensions described above, here’s what you’ll need:

  • Bases: 4 identical objects
  • Foul Poles: 2 identical objects
  • Lines: Chalk or paint
  • Measuring Tools: Tape measure and string
  • People: At least 2

1 | Setting up the bases

The 4 bases should be set up in a diamond/rhombus pattern with all corners spaced 35 feet apart. The distance between home and second and between first and third should measure roughly 50 feet. Mark the sides of the diamond/rhombus using chalk or paint.

2 | Making the foul lines

Plant the 2 foul poles 95 feet away from home base and use paint or chalk to connect home base from the poles. The line should pass over first and second.

3 | Marking the foul, out, single, double, and triple zones

  • Use a tape measure to measure a 15-foot-long piece of string. Have 1 person hold one end of the string while standing on home plate while another holds the other end of the string to create a 15-foot foul-zone arc using chalk or paint.
  • Use a tape measure to measure a 45-foot-long piece of string. Have 1 person hold one end of the string while standing on home plate while another holds the other end of the string to create a 45-foot out-zone arc using chalk or paint.
  • Use a tape measure to measure a 65-foot-long piece of string. Have 1 person hold one end of the string while standing on home plate while another holds the other end of the string to create a 65-foot single-zone arc using chalk or paint.
  • Use a tape measure to measure an 85-foot-long piece of string. Have 1 person hold one end of the string while standing on home plate while another holds the other end of the string to create an 85-foot double-zone arc using chalk or paint.
  • Use a tape measure to measure a 95-foot-long piece of string. Have 1 person hold one end of the string while standing on home plate while another holds the other end of the string to create a 95-foot triple-zone arc using chalk or paint.

4 | Marking the pitcher’s mound

Measure 42 feet between home and second. The 42-foot mark is where the pitcher will stand.

5 | Optional markings

Optional markings include:

  • Batter box
  • Scoreboard
  • Dugout
  • Spectator area

Conclusion

In this guide, I showed you how you can create your own Wiffleball field using nothing but basic materials. The dimensions described in this article adhere to regulation rules set up by a competitive Wiffleball league, but you are more than welcome to use any dimensions and proportions as you wish.

The point of Wiffleball is to have fun and not spend all day setting up the field. Please share this article with your Wiffleball buddies on social media. If you have experience hitting a Wiffleball around, I’d love to hear about what size field you and your friends play on in the comments section.

BaronCooke

Baron Cooke has been writing and editing for 7 years. He grew up with an aptitude for geometry, statistics, and dimensions. He has a BA in construction management and also has studied civil infrastructure, engineering, and measurements. He is the head writer of measuringknowhow.com

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